Data analysis

Seoul IoT Sensor Network Data Analysis to Inform Smart City Policy

Insights from data can help inform Seoul smart city plans

The results of Seoul’s analysis of its network of 1,100 IoT sensors reveal that the temperature in city centers was 2.32°C warmer in summer and 2.16°C in winter than in the mountains.

The Seoul Data of Things (S-Dot) sensor network is installed in major mountains, riversides and city centers, and collects 17 types of urban data, including temperature, humidity, water level, and temperature. lighting, noise and ultrafine particles, every two minutes.

Year data

The analysis was based on data collected from April 2020 to March 2021 and examines how the living environments of Seoulites differ according to the characteristics of each area.

The data collected by the S-DoT is used to verify urban phenomena and establish data-driven smart city policies. The temperature difference in city centers identifies an urban heat island effect as these areas were on average 1 to 3°C warmer.

“The S-DoT serves as an optimal and densely woven infrastructure to observe the urban phenomenon,” said Lee Weon-Mok, general manager of the Smart City Policy Bureau. “The SMG [Seoul Metropolitan Government] will provide services and policies that can improve the value of the city and practically help the lives of our citizens by converging and analyzing S-DoT data with data from the public, private and academic sectors.

In 2020, the sunniest and warmest day, city centers were 3 to 3.4°C or up to 7°C warmer than the mountains, and 1.6 to 1.9°C or up to 4.3°C warmer than the river’s edge. The temperature differences between the city center and the mountain and between the city center and the riverside are affected by many factors such as regions, time, weather and season, but the data showed that the greater the differences in humidity, the greater the differences in temperature.

“The SMG will provide services and policies that can improve the value of the city and practically help the lives of our citizens by converging and analyzing S-DoT data with data from the public, private and academic sectors”

Unlike the Korea Meteorological Administration, which measures the climate in a standardized environment, the S-DoT, installed in the city center, is influenced by urban conditions such as adjacent buildings, roads and air conditioning systems. Moreover, since the S-DoT can be found outdoors – in the mountains of Seoul and the parks of Hangang – as well as in crowded buildings, roads, bus and subway stations, the comparison between the different districts of the city is possible.

In summer, people in the city center felt the humidity dissatisfaction earlier than those in mountainous or riverside areas, and these feelings lasted two to three weeks longer.

Compared to city centers, the level of ultrafine particles in mountain areas was 11.5 ug/m3 lower from November to March on average. From February to March, it was lower by 15 ug/m3, showing a greater deviation.

In seasons other than winter, ultrafine particle levels showed a generally similar trend. City centers are typically 1-3°C warmer in summer than mountains and riversides. We therefore expect an increase in air conditioning bills, but as it is 1 to 2°C warmer in winter as well, there would be an effect of reducing heating costs.

As the S-DoT analysis demonstrates that in summer discontent is higher and lasts longer compared to the other two areas, summer is more likely to have violent crime and traffic accidents. Therefore, it is necessary to take preventive measures to stop such incidents in city centers. As the heat index is higher and the hot and humid tropical nights last longer in the center in summer, the city needs to strengthen its management system for socially isolated isolated households, the elderly and other groups of people. with special needs.

Data collected by S-DoT will be provided to citizens of Seoul as real-time city life environment information on Smart Seoul Map at map.seoul.go.kr starting in August.

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